Announcements

Q&A for 55.2 “Beyond Recovery” with Lauren Coats, Steffi Dippold, and Aileen Tierney.

Volume 55.2 of Early American Literature is a special edition titled “Beyond Recovery.” In order to dive more in-depth into the volume’s theme, guest editors Lauren Coats and Steffi Dippold answered a few questions written by Digital Media Assistant Aileen Tierney to elaborate on the inspiration, theory, and impact of their project regarding archival loss.

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Q. What is "Beyond Recovery" about?

Open Access Article: Christopher Trigg's "The Racial Politics of Resurrection in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World"

Scholars specializing in early American literature have a duty to the public to raise awareness of how past events and beliefs impact our current lives-- especially in the midst of a global pandemic and nationwide protests against systemic racism. This is why EAL has decided to provide Christopher Trigg’s essay, “The Racial Politics of Resurrection in the 18th-Century Atlantic World” open-access on our website.

Early American Literature Book Prize for 2019

Lisa Brooks, Professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College, has been selected to receive the 2019 Early American Literature Book Prize, which is awarded in even calendar years to a first monograph published in the prior two years, and in odd years to a second or subsequent book. Brooks’s Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War was published by Yale University Press in 2018.

2020 Book Prize

The editors of Early American Literature are pleased to announce the sixth annual Early American Literature Book Prize, which will be given for an author’s first academic monograph about American literature through the early national period (roughly 1830). EAL invites work treating Native American traditional expressions, colonial Ibero-American literature from North America, colonial American Francophone writings, Dutch colonial, and German American colonial literature as well as writings in English from British America and the US.

Early American Literature invites proposals for a special issue, “Reframing 1620.”

Its first peoples called themselves “Wôpanâak”--people of the first light. It had been their homeland for thousands of years, before Europeans began to appear along its shores. English colonists who arrived to stay, in 1620, saw it as “Plymouth.”

Deadline Extended to March 1 for the 2019 Book Prize

The deadline for our Early American Literature's 2019 Book Prize has been extended, moved from February 1 to March 1, 2019.

Nominations for second or later books will be accepted through that date. For more information regarding the nomination process, please see our original announcement on the EAL website.

Book Prize for 2018

Professor Caroline Wigginton of the University of Mississippi has been selected to receive the 2018 Early American Literature Book Prize, which is awarded in even calendar years to a first monograph published in the prior two years, and in odd years to a second or subsequent book. Wigginton’s In the Neighborhood: Women’s Publication in Early America was published by the University of Massachusetts Press in 2016.

Early American Literature Invites Nominations of Books for its 2019 Book Prize

The editors of Early American Literature are pleased to announce the fifth annual Early American Literature Book Prize, which will be given for an author’s second or subsequent academic monograph about American literature in the colonial period through the early republic (roughly 1830). The prize is offered in collaboration with the University of North Carolina Press, the Society of Early Americanists, and the MLA’s Forum on American Literature to 1800.

Monographs published in 2017 or 2018 are eligible for the 2019 prize, which carries a cash award of $2000.

Call for Submissions: Special Issue “Beyond Recovery”

The recognition that archives are partial, filled with lacunae that demand scholarly attention, has fueled research engaging the epistemological, cultural, and political forces of early American materials and repositories. While powerful, positivist recovery work—efforts to fill gaps and hear silenced voices— has theoretically and materially expanded early American studies, the archive remains yet and always incomplete.

Early American Literature Invites Nominations of First Books for Its 2018 Book Prize

The editors of Early American Literature are pleased to announce the fourth annual Early American Literature Book Prize, which will be given for a first academic monograph about American literature in the colonial period through the early republic (roughly 1830). The prize is offered in collaboration with the University of North Carolina Press, the Society of Early Americanists, and the MLA's Forum on American Literature to 1800.

First monographs published in 2016 or 2017 are eligible for the 2018 prize, which carries a cash award of $2000. 

Call for Submissions: Special Issue of Early American Literature on "Fictionality"

The decade since the publication of Catherine Gallagher’s landmark essay “The Rise of Fictionality” (2006) has witnessed an increasing concern with overturning well-established theories of the rise of the novel and the development of literary realism through a re-examination of the axiomatic values underpinning contemporary attitudes toward the concept of “fiction.”

Early American Literature 2017 Book Prize

Professor Patricia Crain of New York University has been selected to receive the 2017 Early American Literature Book Prize, which is awarded in odd calendar years to a second or subsequent monograph, and in even years to a first book.  Crain’s book Reading Children: Literacy, Property, and the Dilemmas of Childhood in Nineteenth-Century America was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2016.

Fiftieth Anniversary Special Issue

Early American Literature is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this year. A special issue to mark the occasion is available from the University of North Carolina Press. The issue features articles by Rolena Adorno, Wai Chee Dimock, Simon Gikandi, David Shields, and Priscilla Wald, and an introduction by editor Sandra M. Gustafson.